Oven Repair Help

If your ovens not working properly, here you will find some of the most common problems with solutions to repair a broken oven.

The troubleshooting tips and repair information on this page is for various types of ovens, in general, rather than any one specific brand or model in order to present you with a broad overview of trouble shooting the different parts on an oven with some of the most common solutions to fix it with.

Electric Oven Troubleshooting Section

Oven Won’t Turn On

  1. Electricity – First, you will need to check for a blown fuse or a tripped circuit breaker in your homes main circuit breaker box.
  2. Warning Make sure that the electricity has been turned off or disconnected from your oven before proceeding any further.
  3. Blown Oven Fuse – On some oven models an internal fuse is used to shut the oven off to prevent any further damage to the appliance.  If the fuse has blown, the oven won’t turn on, the fuse can be tested using a multimeter, if the fuse does not have continuity, the part is faulty and will need to be replaced.  Before replacing the fuse with a new one, you will need to inspect or troubleshoot the various components within the oven to determine what caused the fuse to blow.  Visually inspect the internal oven components, look for burnt wires, burnt wire connectors, signs of damage on the heating elements and the elements connections.
  4. Bake Element – The bake element is located on the bottom part of the interior cavity on free standing and wall ovens.. If you have noticed that your electric oven is not heating while you are trying to bake, the heating element may have burned out.  You can test the element for continuity using a digital meter or multimeter.  If the test shows no continuity, the baking element will need to be replaced, if the element has continuity it is good and more troubleshooting will need to be performed.  Safety Reminder Please be sure that your oven has had plenty of time to cool down before testing or removing any internal or external parts.  Some oven parts can hold heat for quite sometime and will still burn you long after the unit has been turned off.
  5. Broil Element – The broil element is located on the inside of the oven cavity at the top and is used for broiling.  Quite often the broiler element is used to help preheat an electric oven faster.  If your element has stopped working you will need to visually inspect it for signs of damage, such as burn marks, bubbling or blistering, burnt or melted terminal ends or a broken spot in the element.  The element can be tested for continuity using a digital or analog multimeter, If the test shows no continuity, the broil element will need to be replaced, if the test shows the element has continuity, it is good and more troubleshooting will need to be performed.  Safety Note Please keep in mind that just because a broiling element does not look hot, doesn’t mean that it isn’t hot, it can still burn you.  You will want to be sure to wear safety gloves while inspecting or troubleshooting any of your oven parts.
  6. Surface Heating Element – The surface heating element is used on the cooktop surface of some electric free standing and slide-in oven models.  If your surface element is not heating you can test the part for continuity with a multimeter.  If the element has continuity it is good, if the test shows no continuity, the element is faulty, and will need to be replaced.
  7. Temperature Sensor – The temperature sensor is used on newer model electronic control ovens, it is used to sense the temperature inside of the oven.  The sensor communicates with the ovens electronic control board, which adjusts the temperature as necessary.  On newer model ovens, a fault code should display on the control panel if the temperature sensor has failed.  Refer to your owners manual, under fault codes.
  8. Electronic Control Board – Inspect the ovens control board, the control board is a difficult part to test,  You can look for a loose wire harness connection or a burnt or melted component on the board.

Oven Won’t Heat

  1. Electricity – First, you will need to check for a blown fuse or a tripped circuit breaker in your homes main circuit breaker box.
  2. Safety Reminder Please be sure that the electricity has been turned off or disconnected completely from the appliance before proceeding any further.
  3. Bake Element – If your kitchen is equipped with an electric free standing oven or a wall oven, the bake element will be located on the bottom part of the ovens interior cavity.  If you have noticed that your electric oven won’t heat up while you are trying to bake, the heating element may have burned out.  You can test the element for continuity using a digital meter or multimeter.  If the test shows no continuity, the baking element will need to be replaced, if the element has continuity it is good and more troubleshooting will need to be performed.  Safety Note Please be sure that your oven has had plenty of time to cool down before testing or removing any internal or external parts.  Some oven parts can hold heat for quite sometime and will still burn you after the appliance has been turned off.
  4. Broil Element – The broil element is located on the inside of the oven cavity at the top and is used for broiling.  Quite often the broiler element is used to help preheat an electric oven faster for baking.  If your element is no longer working you will need to visually inspect it for signs of damage, such as burn marks, bubbling or blistering, burnt or melted terminal ends or a broken spot in the element.  The element can be tested for continuity using a digital or analog multimeter, If the test shows no continuity, the broil element will need to be replaced, if the test shows the element has continuity, it is good and more troubleshooting on your oven will need to be performed.  Note Please keep in mind that just because a broiling element does not look hot, doesn’t mean that it isn’t hot, it can still burn you.  You will want to be sure to wear safety gloves while inspecting or troubleshooting any of your ovens parts.
  5. Surface Heating Element – The surface heating element is used on the cooktop surface of some slide in and free standing electric oven models.  If your surface element is not heating you can test the part for continuity with a multimeter.  If the coil element has continuity it is good, if the test shows no continuity, the element is faulty, and it will need to be replaced.
  6. Blown Thermal Fuse – On some oven models an internal fuse is used to shut the oven off to prevent any further damage to the appliance.  If the fuse has blown, the oven will not turn on, the fuse can be tested using a multimeter, if the fuse does not have continuity, the part is bad and will need to be replaced.  Before replacing the fuse with a new one, you will need to inspect or troubleshoot the various components within the oven to determine what caused the fuse to blow in the first place.  Visually inspect the different internal oven components, look for burnt wires, burnt wire connectors, look for signs of damage on the heating elements, terminals and the elements wiring connections.
  7. Temperature Sensor – The oven temperature sensor is used on newer model electronic control ovens, it is used to measure the temperature inside of the oven.  The sensor relays the temperature to the ovens electronic control board, which adjusts the temperature as necessary.  On newer model ovens a fault code should display on the control panel if the temperature sensor has failed.  Refer to your owners manual under the fault codes.
  8. Electronic Control Board – You will need to inspect the oven control board, the control board can be a difficult part to test.  You will need to look for a loose wire harness connection. burnt or melted circuits on the component.

Oven Won’t Broil

  1. Broil element If your electric oven won’t broil but it will bake, You will need to inspect the element for visual signs of damage such as a small hole or a break in the element where it has shorted out or any other obvious damage, it may have a wire that has come off of the terminal ends on the element or one of the wires may have shorted where it connects to the broil element ends terminals.  If you do not find any obvious damage you can test the element for continuity using a digital or analog multi-meter, the broil element should have continuity.  If it does not have continuity the element is faulty and will need to be replaced.
  2. Electronic Control Board – A faulty electronic oven control board could prevent the broil element from heating.  inspect the electronic control board. and replace it if you see any burnt spots, melted relays or any other signs of damage.
  3. Relay Control Board – Some electric ovens have a relay control board that’s separate from the electronic control board. The relay control board has the electrical relay that controls the voltage going to the broiling element.  Inspect the relay control board. and replace it if you detect any burnt spots, melted relays or any other signs of damage.
  4. Temperature Sensor – The temperature sensor is used on newer model electronic control ovens, it is used to sense the temperature inside of the oven.  The sensor communicates with the ovens electronic control board, which adjusts the ovens temperature as necessary.  On some newer model ovens, a fault code will be displayed on the control panel if the temperature sensor has failed.  A faulty oven sensor can send misleading readings to the control board causing it to behave incorrectly, resulting in inaccurate cooking temperatures or fault codes on the electronic control’s display.   A faulty oven sensor is most often responsible for either an F3 or F4 error message on the control display.

Oven Won’t Bake

  1. Bake element  If your electric oven won’t bake but it will broil, You will need to inspect the element for visual signs of damage such as a small hole or a break in the element where it has shorted out or any other obvious damage, it may have a wire that has come off of the terminal ends on the element or one of the wires may have shorted where it connects to the baking element ends terminals.  If you do not find any obvious damage you can test the element for continuity using a digital or analog multi-meter, the bake element should have continuity.  If it does not have continuity the element is bad and it will need to be replaced.
  2. Electronic Control Board – A damaged oven control board could prevent the baking element from heating.  inspect the electronic  control board, look for a loose wire harness connection or a burnt or melted component on the control board.  If any of the mentioned damage is found, you will need to replace the board.
  3. Temperature Sensor – The temperature sensor is used on some newer model electronic controlled ovens, the sensor is used to sense the temperature inside of the oven.  The sensor communicates with the ovens electronic control board, which will adjust the ovens baking temperature as necessary.  On some newer model ovens, a fault code will be displayed on the control panel when the temperature sensor has failed.  A faulty oven sensor can send misleading readings to the control board causing it to behave incorrectly, resulting in inaccurate cooking temperatures or fault codes on the electronic control’s display.   A faulty oven sensor is most often responsible for either the F3 or the F4 error codes that will be displayed on the control panel.
  4. Relay Control Board – Some electric ovens have a relay control board that is separate from the electronic control board. The relay control board has the electrical relay that controls the voltage to the baking element.  You will need to inspect the relay control board. and replace it if you detect any burnt spots, melted relays or any other visual signs of damage on the board,

Surface Element Won’t Heat

  1. Surface Heating Element – Heating elements are insulated coils with a metal covering that creates heat and electrical resistance to achieve a desired temperature that has been selected.  If your electric ovens cooktop has a surface coil element that is not heating, you need to check the heating element for visual signs of damage.  You will need to locate the element that is not heating up and visually inspect it thoroughly to determine weather or not it has any damage.  Look for cracks, burnt or chard spots, blistering on the element or a break in the coil.  If you have done a thorough visual inspection of the element and do not find any obvious signs of damage, you will then need to do a continuity test using either a digital or analog multimeter to determine weather or not the heating element has continuity.  If the element has continuity, then the part is good and should function properly, If the test shows that the element does not have  continuity then the element is bad and will need to be replaced.
  2. Radiant Heating Element – You will need to locate the element under the ovens cooktop surface that is not heating up and visually inspect it to determine weather or not it has any damage.  Look for cracks, burnt or chard spots on the element or a break in the radiant element coil.  If you have done a thorough visual inspection of the element and do not find any obvious damage, you will then need to do a continuity test using a test meter to determine weather the heating element has continuity or not.  If the test shows the element has continuity, then it is good and element should function properly, If the element tests show that it does not have continuity then it is bad and you will need to replace it.
  3. Receptacle – If your ovens surface unit starts working erratically, the terminal ends on the ovens and element may be charred or burnt. This will cause the surface element to loose electrical contact at times with the terminal block that it is plugged into. It is always best to replace both the element and the terminal block.  If the terminals on the element are burnt then the contacts on the block are probably burnt as well.  If a new element is used with a burnt terminal block the parts may not last very long or give you proper service.
  4. Surface Element Switch – The surface element switch also known as the surface control switch and the infinite control switch, is used on a free standing ovens cooktop surface to control and send voltage to the surface element.  Some of the most common signs of a faulty surface element switch are, the surface element may stay at high heat.  The surface element may stay at high heat no matter what setting you have the selector knob on the switch set at or you may not be able to turn the surface element on or off at all.  If the surface element is acting erratically, the surface element control switch is the main culprit and it should be replaced.

Gas Oven Troubleshooting Section

Oven Won’t Turn On

  1. Incoming Electricity – First, you will need to check for a blown fuse or a tripped circuit breaker in your homes main circuit breaker box.  Second, test the electric wall outlet with a test meter or you can try plugging something else that runs on 110 volts into the electrical outlet to see if the outlet is faulty or good.

Oven Won’t Heat

  1. Spark Electrode – Modern gas ovens use some form of electronic ignition system, such as the spark electrode or an igniter system.  These ignition systems have replaced the older oven style gas flame pilot lights.  Oven models using a spark ignition system also have an actual gas pilot like a pilot ignition system only the pilot does not stay lit all the time.  Instead, when the ovens thermostat is turned on, gas flows to the ovens safety valve and also to the ovens pilot, which gets lit with a spark.  Once the pilot is lit and the safety valve’s sensor bulb senses the pilot flame, that valve will then open, allowing the gas to flow to the ovens burner where the pilot flame ignites the gas burner.  
  2. Oven Igniter – The oven igniter, also known as the glow bar is used in some free standing and wall gas oven models.  It is located under the burner shield inside the bottom part of the oven compartment, mounted right next to the gas burner tube.  The igniter is used to open the gas valve and to ignite the gas.   As the igniter draws electrical current it will heat to a high temperature and glow red hot, as well as cause the bi metal in the ovens safety valve to warp and open the valve releasing the gas to be ignited into flame.  The igniter can become week over time, if you can see that your oven igniter is glowing, but will not light the gas too flame it may need to be replaced.  If the igniter does not glow at all, it is faulty and will need to be replaced.  You can test the igniter for continuity using a digital meter or multimeter if the test shows no continuity, the igniter will need to be replaced, if the igniter has continuity it is good and more troubleshooting will need to be performed.
  3. Thermostat – The thermostat is used on some gas oven models to control the temperature inside of the oven.  When the desired temperature has been reached, the thermostat will turn off the heat source.  When the ovens temperature begins to fall, the thermostat will cycle the heat back on.  The most common symptoms of a faulty thermostat are, undercooked food or an oven that either won’t turn on or turn off.
  4. Safety Valve – If the ovens igniter comes on glows red hot for 90 seconds and does not light the burner, you will need to test the safety valve for continuity.  You can test the safety valve for continuity using a digital meter or multimeter if the test shows no continuity, the valve will need to be replaced, if the valve does have continuity it is good and more troubleshooting will need to be performed.
  5. Oven Control Board – The oven control board is a difficult part to test,  you can visually inspect the main control board, look for a loose wire harness connection or a burnt or melted component on the control boards electrical components.  If any of the mentioned damage is found, you will need to replace the control board.  

Surface Burner Won’t Light

  1. No Gas – If your burner is clicking but not igniting check to make sure that the gas supply to the oven is in the open position and that you have gas going to the burner.
  2. Burner Cap – If your oven model is equipped with a burner cap and you here clicking but the surface burner won’t light, check to make sure that the burner cap is centered correctly on the base of the ovens burner.
  3. Clogged burner – A clicking sound will occur if the burner ports on your cooktop are clogged this may prevent the gas burner from lighting and the ignitor may continue clicking.  If that is the problem you can clean out the debris and buildup from the ports using a fine metal pin.  If moisture is in the burner ports from cooking spills the burner won’t ignite.  (Turn off the gas supply to the oven) and use a hairdryer set on the cool cycle to dry the burners out.
  4. Spark Electrode – A week or bad spark electrodes can be the cause of a rapid clicking sound, but the top burner will not light.
  5. Electronic Ignition Switch Some gas oven models use an electronic ignition system does not use a pilot light, instead it uses an ignition switch attached to the burner control knob.  When the burner control knob is turned to lite the surface burner, electricity is supplied through the ignition switch creating the spark to light the gas burner. The ignition switch can break causing the switch to click continuously, or it may not even click at all.   When one ignition switch becomes faulty, they will all fail being that they are all wired together.

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